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Monday, October 16, 2017


 

DON'T LET THIS HAPPEN TO YOUR HOME!

BEWARE! TAKE FIRE PREVENTION CARE!

TRUE OR FALSE:
A fire is something that happens...
  1. On a television newscast!
  2. To somebody else's home!
  3. To another person's business!
  4. In a remote location - away from you and your family.

If you said TRUE four times, we all have some work to do. Let's be realistic! If you've never been the victim of a fire - or known someone who has, you are very fortunate. Let's keep it that way.

These few reminders may seem quite simple, and they are. But when you stop and think a moment, the simple basics can save lives- much suffering - and a great deal of property.




EXIT DRILLS IN THE HOME
(E.D.I.T.H)

  1. Prepare a floor plan of your home showing at least two ways out of each room.
     
  2. Sleep with your bedroom door closed. It helps to hold back heat and smoke.
     
  3. Agree on a fixed location out-of-doors where family members are to gather for a head count.
     
  4. Make certain that no one goes back inside.
     
  5. Practice - Practice - Practice.


HOME FIRE SAFETY CHECKLIST
PRE-FIRE PLANNING YES NO
Have you planned at least two ways to get out of every room in your home?
Do you keep exit routes clear in your home?
Do you know how to notify your fire department quickly and correctly in case of fire?
ESPECIALLY FOR CHILDREN YES NO
Do you make it a rule never to leave small children alone or unattended?
Do your baby-sitters (and you) know the first rule of safety in fire emergencies? Get everybody out fast, and don't go back in.
Do you show your baby-sitters the escape routes from your home, and give instructions on the correct way to report a fire?
GOOD SMOKING HABITS YES NO
Is smoking in bed strictly against the rule in your home?
Do you always make sure that cigarette, cigar and pipe ashes are completely extinguished before you dispose of them? Before going to bed, be SURE there are no cigarettes still burning.
Are matches kept out of the reach of children? Keep matches and lighters above the "strike zone" (too high for children to reach).
HEATING AND COOKING YES NO
Are furnaces, stoves and smokepipes kept in good repair and located far enough away from combustible walls and ceilings so that they do not create a hazard? Use a fireplace screen to prevent sparks from flying.
If you have portable space heaters in your home do you see that they are properly maintained and located? Keep portable space heaters away from people, curtains, and furniture.
Do you have an annual inspection of your heating system? Have heating equipment checked and cleaned each year.
Do your sleeves get into things when you cook? Wear tight-fitting clothing when you cook.
Can you stop a cooking fire safely? Smother a pan fire with a lid. Never use water. If cooking oil starts to smoke, turn down the heat. Don't throw whatever's handy on the counter, such as dumping flower from the bag, on the fire (explosion!)
ELECTRICITY YES NO
Do you see that extension cords are never run under rugs or hooked over nails? Avoid using extension cords wherever possible (especially small-wired cords use with high-wattage appliances.)
When the breaker "trips" or a fuse blows, do you investigate WHY it happened? If a fuse blows (or a breaker "trips"), find the cause. Remove excess appliances (lamps, stereo components, space heaters, etc.) from a breaker circuit that frequently "trips".
Is the right size fuse (20 amps for lighting circuits) in each socket in the fuse box? Replace the fuse with one of the correct size.
Is your TV well ventillated? Allow air space around the TV to prevent overheating. If it doesn't work right, it can be a fire danger.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING YES NO
Do you keep rubbish cleaned out of the attic, basement, closets, garage and yard? Sort and remove rubbish. Don't store things near the furnace or heater.
Are gasoline and other flammable liquids stored in safety cans, and kept well away from both heat and children? Move flammable liquids away from heat. Do not store flammable liquids in the home. Keep them stored outside and away from the house in a separate storage building. Don't fill a hot lawn mower or other motor; let it cool first.


IF YOUR HOME CAUGHT FIRE,
WOULD YOU KNOW WHAT TO DO?

WOULD YOUR CHILDREN?

10 TIPS FOR GENERAL FIRE SAFETY

1.         Install smoke detectors        

Working smoke detectors can alert you to a fire in your home in time for you to escape, even if you are sleeping.  Install smoke detectors on every level of your home, including the basement, and outside each sleeping area.  If you sleep with the door closed, install one inside your sleeping area as well.

Test detectors every month, following the manufacture's directions, and replace batteries once a year or whenever a detector "chirps" to signal low battery power.  Never "borrow" a smoke detector's battery for another use - a disabled detector can't save your life.  Replace detectors that are more than 10 years old.

For complete protection, consider installing automatic fire sprinklers in addition to smoke detectors.

 

2.         Keep an eye on smokers

 

Careless smoking is the leading cause of fire deaths in North America.  Smoking in bed or when you are drowsy could be fatal.  Provide smokers with large, deep, non-tip ashtrays, and soak butts with water before discarding them.  Before going to bed or leaving home after someone has been smoking, check under and around cushions and upholstered furniture for soldering cigarettes

 

3.         Cook carefully

 

Never leave cooking unattended.  Keep cooking areas clear of combustibles, and wear clothes with short, rolled-up, or tight-fitting sleeves when you cook.  Turn pot handles inward on the stove where you can't bump them and children can't grab them.  Enforce a "kid-free zone" that is three feet around your kitchen stove.  If grease catches fire in a pan, slide a lid over the pan to smother the flames and turn off the heat source.  Leave the lid on until the pan is completely cool.

 

4.         Plan your escape from fire

 

If a fire breaks out in your home, you have to get out fast.  Prepare for a fire emergency by sitting down with your family and designing an escape plan.  Be sure that everyone knows at least two unobstructed ways out - doors and windows - from every room.  (If you live in an apartment building, use the stairs - do not include elevators in your escape plan.)  Decide on a meeting place outside where everyone will gather after they escape.  Have your entire household practice your escape plan at least twice a year.

 

5.         Give space heaters space

 

Keep portable heaters and space heaters at least three feet away from anything that can burn.  Keep children and pets away from heaters, and never leave heaters on when you leave home or go to bed.

 

6.         Remember: matches and lighters are tools, not toys

 

In a child's hands, matches and lighters can be deadly.  Use only child-resistant lighters and store all matches and lighters up high, where kids can't see or reach them, preferably in a locked cabinet.  Teach young children that and lighters are tools, not toys, and should be used by adults only or with adult supervision.  Teach young children not to touch them and to tell a grownup if they find matches or lighters; older children should bring matches and lighters to an adult immediately.

 

7.         Cool a burn

 

Run cool water over a burn for 10 to 15 minutes.  Never apply ice.  It is dangerous to put butter or any other grease on a burn because it seals in the heat and can damage the tissue further.  If the burned skin blisters or is charred, see a doctor immediately.

 

8.         Use electricity safely

 

If an electric appliance smokes or has an unusual smell, unplug it immediately, and have it serviced before using it again.  Replace any electrical cord that is cracked or frayed.  Don't overload extension cords or run them under rugs.  Don't tamper with your fuse box or use improperly sized fuses.

 

9.         Crawl low under smoke

 

If an electric appliance smokes or has an unusual smell, unplug it immediately, and have it serviced before using it again.  Replace any electrical cord that is cracked or frayed.  Don't overload extension cords or run them under rugs.  Don't tamper with your fuse box or use improperly sized fuses.

 

10.       Stop, drop and roll

 

If your clothes catch fire, don't run.  Stop where you are, drop to the ground, cover your face with your hands, and roll over and over to smother the flames.


 

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